Cinnamon

Description

Cinnamon is the dried inner bark of various evergreen trees belonging to the genus Cinnamomum. At harvest, the bark is stripped off and put in the sun, where it curls into the familiar form called "quills."

Uses

Cinnamon in the ground form is used in baked dishes, with fruits, and in confections. Cassia is predominant in the spice blends of the East and Southeast Asia. Cinnamon is used in moles, garam masala, and berbere.

Origins

Cinnamomum burmannii is primarily imported from Indonesia and is the most common form of Cinnamon in the United States. Once again, Vietnam has become the source for Cinnamomun loureirii, referred to as Saigon Cinnamon, and considered the finest Cinnamon available. Cinnamomum zeylanicum, grown in Sri Lanka, is actually "true Cinnamon" but is not widely used in the United States due to its unique flavor.

Folklore

Cinnamon was one of the first known spices. The Romans believed Cinnamon's fragrance sacred and burned it at funerals. Because Cinnamon was one of the first spices sought in the 15th Century European explorations, some say it indirectly led to the discovery of America.

Quick Facts

Ground Cinnamon

Color

Reddish, brown

Flavor & Aroma

Sweet and pungent

Sensory Profile

Cinnamon is characteristically woody, musty and earthy in flavor and aroma. It is warming to taste. The finer the grind, the more quickly the Cinnamon is perceived by the taste buds.
Health Research
: MSI Funded
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University studied the effects of a behavioral intervention, which emphasized spices and herbs, on the maintenance of sodium intake at the recommended intake of 1500 mg/d.
Researchers at the UCLA School of Medicine conducted a study to evaluate the impact of spices added to broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach on amount and rate of vegetable consumption.
Researchers at The Pennsylvania State University examined the effects of culinary spices and psychological stress on postprandial lipemia and lipase activity.

View more Cinnamon research